2-Year-Old Eden Discusses the Creative Process

Eden Birch discusses the Creative Process from WeMakeStuffVancouver on Vimeo.

The power behind this film is immense. This 2-year-old’s embodiment of the artistic process has something to teach even an aged master.  Her sheer delight, and ours, in the creative work must put to rest worried distortions we bring to bear on our work – perfectionism, self-consciousness, fear.

About WeMakeStuff:

WeMakeStuff is a network of creatives. WeMakeStuff exists to affirm the vocation of Canadian artists and innovators by documenting what the Creator is already doing through creative people. WeMakeStuff originated in the Vancouver area but there’s no telling where it’s going to go.

Go to wemakestuff.ca and www.Facebook.com/WeMakeStuffVancouver

And So She Went: Laura Kay Rudat, Filmmaker

Laura Kay Rudat, filmmaker, is full of surprises and is an incredible story-teller. Her brief yet fascinating filmmaking career has taken her to some of the most unlikely places on earth. In India she filmed the documentary A House for Vasan (below) telling the story of Hands on Houses, which builds houses for widows and the poor. In California she created her thesis film Moriah (bottom of page).

Her upcoming project will be with a team in the Philippines. She is raising money for that here.

A House for Vasan from Laura Kay Rudat on Vimeo.

A bit of her story: I met Laura a few years ago at university near Vancouver, Canada. She was studying International Relations and figuring out what to do next. Over a period of time she was confronted powerfully and mysteriously with the realization that she was supposed to move to San Francisco. She describes the experience with the following words in a post entitled “Dear Reader”:

Many of you are wondering how I got to this point–bags packed, and hours away from moving to San Francisco.

Aware that my student visa was due to expire at the end of August, I began to pray about my next step. I sensed my time in Canada was up, so opted out of extending my stay. In this time of seeking His will, God began speaking to me about San Francisco. The idea was strange to me for several reasons.

To begin with, I was happier than I’d ever been in Langley. Freshly graduated and surrounded by close friends and an amazing church community, I had no reason to leave. Washington would have been the logical option if I were to leave; there I could enjoy the familiarity of home and family. Not only had I never been to San Francisco, but I didn’t really know anyone there (though I later learned two of my cousins have recently moved there).

But God was relentless. Every day, for about a month and a half, San Francisco came up in the most random of ways. Conversations on wholly different topics would suddenly swerve towards San Francisco. Somehow, everything I encountered in my day would subtlety or blatantly (depending on my level of doubt that day) orient my future-focus towards this city. Throughout this time, I began to feel peace about going and I received still more confirmations. Once I decided for sure I was going, whether I knew why or not, the signs virtually stopped. It was as if God said, “Phew. She finally understands.”

I thought that after making this decision, God would reveal more of the plan. But as I get ready to leave today, I know almost nothing. He is requiring me to trust Him more by not taking the matter into my own hands. But I do have promises, which I continue to hope in (Hope that is seen is not hope. For who hopes in what he sees?). I have promises of provision, purpose, community, joy, and His best.

It was a year in San Francisco before she had her next big realization: that her hobby-love for filmmaking was not only real, but what she was meant to pursue. Entering film school and subsequently working things out in dead space after graduating was a testing time period for Laura, but things changed shortly for the better. In the last year she has moved north to Redding where her presence at Global Legacy has taken both her love for the nations and her love for filmmaking and married them in a dream come true. She is truly living the dream.

Laura’s fun, quirky, and inspiring blog And So She Went will tell the rest of her exciting and challenging story. In the meantime, find Laura Kay at film festivals and on Vimeo.

The Dare – Gina Williams

She’s a singer, a pianist, an actress, and an educator. After shelving her master’s degree in Piano performance for a decade, Gina Williams “dared” herself to perform again at the Bell Performing Arts Centre in Surrey, BC, Canada on October 20, 2012. The Dare is a 65-person multi-genre performance. Tickets are available at the door. For all other details, watch!

Gina Williams – The Dare October 20th from Craig Ketchum on Vimeo.

Hydro-solar Graffiti

Continuing in the vein of high-tech “graffiti”, is this interesting and quirky video on hydro-solar, or “water-light” graffiti by Antonin Fourneau and Digitalarti Artlab. The process uses LEDs illuminated by water contact.

Water Light Graffiti by Antonin Fourneau, created in the Digitalarti Artlab from Digitalarti on Vimeo.

Invisible Video Graffiti

Like a magic trick, this kind of graffiti is totally mind-boggling without an explanation.

First watch the video, then read the an excerpt from the story by The Atlantic below, and visit The Atlantic for the full read.

SWEATSHOPPE Video Painting Europe from SWEATSHOPPE on Vimeo.

 

From The Atlantic:

“Art collective Sweatshoppe uses infrared tracking inside concrete rollers to ‘smear’ digital video over concrete surfaces with paint rollers.

They say: “As a new media artist I work with a lot of new emerging technologies, a lot of times just toying around with different things and putting them together to see what fits. When you’re creating art in this way you’re constantly faced with questions about art history and how different movements came about — in many ways the history and evolution of modern art has been dependent on the emergence of new technologies from the invention of oil paint to electronic sound and video and so on.

“The explosion in the popularity of street art proved how much painting on walls could be a powerful way to communicate ideas, so painting combined with projection and interactivity became an obvious choice.

“I work a lot with what is called computer vision software, algorithms that identify objects and track them with a live video feed. The software I wrote tracks the position of infrared LEDs inside the paint roller when they are turned on by the user, and tells the projector where to reveal the image. Essentially we have to line up the webcam with the video projection, and where ever the painter decides to stroke the image will appear, allowing you to paint with videos. Additionally we can paint layers of video to develop a narrative within the performance and create video collages.” (Interview with The Atlantic)

Amazing.

For the full story, visit The Atlantic